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Wildlife and science photographer. Images published in @NatGeo and @insidenatgeo. Neukom Fellow at Dartmouth College.

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Instagram post's of @jtkerby

Reindeer roam the tundra of Russia’s Yamal Penninsula. This is home to the Nenets people that have been herding these reindeer for countless generations.  Scientists have teamed up with the Nenets to learn how reindeer change the tundra - both by what they eat and what they trample.  This is an important piece of the complex puzzle of changing tundra - and the permafrost that rests beneath it -  in a RAPIDLY warming Arctic. Scene from fieldwork with colleagues on the #HUMANOR project. My involvement in this trip was supported by @insidenatgeo, @dartmoutharctic, the #NeukomInstitute, and @dartmouthdickey.  #Russia #Siberia #Reindeer #Nenets #NatGeo
777 likes 4

Reindeer roam the tundra of Russia’s Yamal Penninsula. This is home to the Nenets people that have been herding these reindeer for countless generations. Scientists have teamed up with the Nenets to learn how reindeer change the tundra - both by what they eat and what they trample. This is an important piece of the complex puzzle of changing tundra - and the permafrost that rests beneath it - in a RAPIDLY warming Arctic. Scene from fieldwork with colleagues on the #HUMANOR project. My involvement in this trip was supported by @insidenatgeo, @dartmoutharctic, the #NeukomInstitute, and @dartmouthdickey. #Russia #Siberia #Reindeer #Nenets #NatGeo

2 weeks ago
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Call for info: Algal blooms in Arctic Lakes - is this common? Who is in the know about this? // While flying low over the tundra on NW Siberia on the Yamal Peninsula in the heatwave of 2017, I saw many Arctic lakes experiencing algal blooms. This is not something I’d noticed on other trips north of the Arctic Circle. I’m curious to learn how common this is, how it affects ecosystem ecology, etc. // Side note: the Arctic IS warming much faster than the rest of the planet. In some senses, it’s a canary in a coal mine - we need to pay attention to changes in the far north. Not only are these changes indications of warming, but they are also drivers of processes that affect the release and cycling of carbon that could reshape global climate dynamics (via permafrost thaw and HUGE amounts of carbon release). Arctic change is global change. // From fieldwork with a diverse crew of researchers, with my specific involvement supported by @insidenatgeo, @dartmoutharctic, and @dartmouthcollege #NeukomInstitute. #Arctic #NatGeo #Tundra #Bloom #Siberia

3 weeks ago
Reindeer on the move in Northwest Siberia.  Nenets reindeer herders travel with their reindeer up and down the Yamal Peninsula following high quality plant growth.  In 2017 I joined a larger team of researchers from Russia, Finland, and beyond to work alongside the Nenets to better understand the role that reindeer play in controlling tundra change.  This work continues to this day! My specific involvement in this larger #HUMANOR project was made possible with support from @insidenatgeo, @dartmoutharctic and the @dartmouthcollege #NeukomInstitute. #Arctic #Reindeer #Siberia #Tundra #NatGeo
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Reindeer on the move in Northwest Siberia. Nenets reindeer herders travel with their reindeer up and down the Yamal Peninsula following high quality plant growth. In 2017 I joined a larger team of researchers from Russia, Finland, and beyond to work alongside the Nenets to better understand the role that reindeer play in controlling tundra change. This work continues to this day! My specific involvement in this larger #HUMANOR project was made possible with support from @insidenatgeo, @dartmoutharctic and the @dartmouthcollege #NeukomInstitute. #Arctic #Reindeer #Siberia #Tundra #NatGeo

3 weeks ago
Ecologist Bruce Forbes, of the Arctic Centre - University of Lapland.  After a long day on the baking hot tundra (heat wave that summer!) in northwest Siberia, Bruce takes stock of the reindeer research project amidst the glowing mosquito swarm. My involvement in this larger project made possible by support from @insidenatgeo @dartmoutharctic and the @dartmouthcollege Neukom Institute. #Arctic #Tundra #Ecology #scientistsatwork #Russia #Siberia
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Ecologist Bruce Forbes, of the Arctic Centre - University of Lapland. After a long day on the baking hot tundra (heat wave that summer!) in northwest Siberia, Bruce takes stock of the reindeer research project amidst the glowing mosquito swarm. My involvement in this larger project made possible by support from @insidenatgeo @dartmoutharctic and the @dartmouthcollege Neukom Institute. #Arctic #Tundra #Ecology #scientistsatwork #Russia #Siberia

3 weeks ago
‘Chipper’ lived a short but full life. She was a slayer of countless mosquitoes, and a friend to all human shoulders and heads. A reindeer herding dog, however, did not appreciate her special gifts and, much to the world’s sorrow, ate her. #Arctic #Yamal #Fieldwork #Tundra @insidenatgeo
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‘Chipper’ lived a short but full life. She was a slayer of countless mosquitoes, and a friend to all human shoulders and heads. A reindeer herding dog, however, did not appreciate her special gifts and, much to the world’s sorrow, ate her. #Arctic #Yamal #Fieldwork #Tundra @insidenatgeo

chamiltonjames Best caption ever

3 weeks ago
The graves of dead whalers on Herschel Island (Qikiqtaruk). Signposts to a different era when whale oil fueled lamps across the world and young sailors - including one teenager from Hawaii - left their homes to live, work, and die here.  These graves have been turned over by permafrost thaw dynamics over the past century, resulting in a macabre landscape.  Photo from summer fieldwork with @teamshrub with funding support from @insidenatgeo. #YukonParks #Arctic #Canada @dartmoutharctic #DartArctic #Permafrost
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The graves of dead whalers on Herschel Island (Qikiqtaruk). Signposts to a different era when whale oil fueled lamps across the world and young sailors - including one teenager from Hawaii - left their homes to live, work, and die here. These graves have been turned over by permafrost thaw dynamics over the past century, resulting in a macabre landscape. Photo from summer fieldwork with @teamshrub with funding support from @insidenatgeo. #YukonParks #Arctic #Canada @dartmoutharctic #DartArctic #Permafrost

4 weeks ago
On a rare sunny day on Herschel Island this summer, Team Shrub member Luke Hull (@lhull87) and I set off to drone-map as much of the island’s interior as possible while the good weather lasted.  Tens of thousands of drone pics and several hours later (we stitch them together to make hi-res maps)...it was somehow still sunny and we had no more batteries left to fly drones. Time to adventure! We set off with our bear spray and cameras to walk to the other side of the island.  As we approached the huge thaw cliffs to the north, Luke spotted a flash of color. Then another...and another.  The entire hillside was swarming with fox pups! We crept up and waited to see if any would approach.  This dark pup was the most inquisitive, checking us out before heading back into its den.  Despite its coloration, this is a red fox - a species that has been displacing Arctic foxes from parts of their native range.  Running into foxes on Herschel Island varies from year to year. Sometimes they come and play around camp (check out some of @sandra.angers.b incredible shots from 2018), whereas other years there’s almost no sign of them.  So goes life in the Arctic - hard to predict what you’re going to get! Scientific and photographic work made possible in part by grants from @insidenatgeo to Dr. Isla Myers-Smith (@teamshrub) and PhD student Gergana Daskalova (@gndaskalova). #YukonParks #Arctic #Qikiqtaruk #HerechelIsland #Arctic #Canada #TeamShrub #NatGeo #insidenatgeo
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On a rare sunny day on Herschel Island this summer, Team Shrub member Luke Hull (@lhull87) and I set off to drone-map as much of the island’s interior as possible while the good weather lasted. Tens of thousands of drone pics and several hours later (we stitch them together to make hi-res maps)...it was somehow still sunny and we had no more batteries left to fly drones. Time to adventure! We set off with our bear spray and cameras to walk to the other side of the island. As we approached the huge thaw cliffs to the north, Luke spotted a flash of color. Then another...and another. The entire hillside was swarming with fox pups! We crept up and waited to see if any would approach. This dark pup was the most inquisitive, checking us out before heading back into its den. Despite its coloration, this is a red fox - a species that has been displacing Arctic foxes from parts of their native range. Running into foxes on Herschel Island varies from year to year. Sometimes they come and play around camp (check out some of @sandra.angers.b incredible shots from 2018), whereas other years there’s almost no sign of them. So goes life in the Arctic - hard to predict what you’re going to get! Scientific and photographic work made possible in part by grants from @insidenatgeo to Dr. Isla Myers-Smith (@teamshrub) and PhD student Gergana Daskalova (@gndaskalova). #YukonParks #Arctic #Qikiqtaruk #HerechelIsland #Arctic #Canada #TeamShrub #NatGeo #insidenatgeo

last month
Arctic storm walk with Dr. Isla Myers-Smith (@teamshrub) - #NationalGeographic #Explorer and Arctic tundra scientist.  Words from here recently posted blog at: teamshrub.com/2019/09/07/weathered-in/———- “The end of the field season is always a strange time - a limbo between Arctic fieldwork and the return to the rest of your life.  You have a list of goals for the summer that are mostly ticked off. But there is still a mad rush to get the last things done. You say to yourself, ‘this is the last time I will walk around the spit’ or ‘this will be the last sauna’...”. Read the rest of her post to find out just how wrong we all were about our fantasies of a timely departure!  Part of this fieldwork was supported with a grant from @insidenatgeo #Yukon #HerschelIsland #Qikiqtaruk #Canada #YukonParks @dartmoutharctic #UEdinburgh
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Arctic storm walk with Dr. Isla Myers-Smith (@teamshrub) - #NationalGeographic #Explorer and Arctic tundra scientist. Words from here recently posted blog at: teamshrub.com/2019/09/07/weathered-in/ ———- “The end of the field season is always a strange time - a limbo between Arctic fieldwork and the return to the rest of your life. You have a list of goals for the summer that are mostly ticked off. But there is still a mad rush to get the last things done. You say to yourself, ‘this is the last time I will walk around the spit’ or ‘this will be the last sauna’...”. Read the rest of her post to find out just how wrong we all were about our fantasies of a timely departure! Part of this fieldwork was supported with a grant from @insidenatgeo #Yukon #HerschelIsland #Qikiqtaruk #Canada #YukonParks @dartmoutharctic #UEdinburgh

last month
“That can’t be a polar bear. It’s not even white!” The ice left Qikiqtaruk - Herschel Island early this year, and it remained far off as summer colors faded from the landscape. Not the time we’d expect to see a polar bear in this part of Canada, yet there it was.  With a rear end slathered in mud from recently thawed permafrost, we initially mistook it for a grizzly.  As the haze over Pauline Cove broke again, however, its distinctive form and less muddied face and forelimbs made its ID immediately clear.  Like us, the bear’s activities seemed slowed by the storm.  For several days, it slept and sauntered around the far side of the cove, searching for bird nests and absorbing the persistent rain and winds.  The Yukon Parks Rangers kept a watch on its movements, at times joined by various members of @teamshrub, as time passed without much change in the weather.  It all seems so normal when you’re there, but now this scene strikes me differently. The rain, the thawed permafrost, the ice-free waters - this is not what I would typically conjure when I think ‘polar bear habitat’. So here’s a picture to remind us that polar bears live across diverse realms, and that in the future, you may be seeing more photos like this and fewer with them in ice-bound hunting grounds.  @insidenatgeo helped support the research and photography on this expedition with their grants to Isla Myers-Smith and Gergana Daskalova of @teamshrub. #NatGeo #InsideNatGeo #Arctic #Yukon #TeamShrub #DartArctic @dartmoutharctic #UEdinburgh #Polarbear
1.7k likes 14

“That can’t be a polar bear. It’s not even white!” The ice left Qikiqtaruk - Herschel Island early this year, and it remained far off as summer colors faded from the landscape. Not the time we’d expect to see a polar bear in this part of Canada, yet there it was. With a rear end slathered in mud from recently thawed permafrost, we initially mistook it for a grizzly. As the haze over Pauline Cove broke again, however, its distinctive form and less muddied face and forelimbs made its ID immediately clear. Like us, the bear’s activities seemed slowed by the storm. For several days, it slept and sauntered around the far side of the cove, searching for bird nests and absorbing the persistent rain and winds. The Yukon Parks Rangers kept a watch on its movements, at times joined by various members of @teamshrub, as time passed without much change in the weather. It all seems so normal when you’re there, but now this scene strikes me differently. The rain, the thawed permafrost, the ice-free waters - this is not what I would typically conjure when I think ‘polar bear habitat’. So here’s a picture to remind us that polar bears live across diverse realms, and that in the future, you may be seeing more photos like this and fewer with them in ice-bound hunting grounds. @insidenatgeo helped support the research and photography on this expedition with their grants to Isla Myers-Smith and Gergana Daskalova of @teamshrub. #NatGeo #InsideNatGeo #Arctic #Yukon #TeamShrub #DartArctic @dartmoutharctic #UEdinburgh #Polarbear

last month
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Ecologist and @InsideNatGeo Explorer Gergana Daskalova (@gndaskalova) retrieves a temperature sensor from a permafrost freezer carved/blown out of the Arctic tundra. The subsequent photos show the interior better illuminated. The island’s below-ground freezers date back to the whaling era on Qikiqtaruk-Herschel Island, though all have since collapsed apart from this one. The temperature records Gergana is collecting with @teamshrub and in collaboration with the #YukonParks Rangers gives clues about the anticipated lifespan of this last surviving ice locker. As the ancient ice within and under the tundra continues to thaw, some of the most dramatic changes will be those we cannot see from the surface. Their impacts (via carbon release), however, are poised to change global climate systems. #Arctic #Permafrost #Canada #Ecology #NatGeo #UEdinburgh #Geosciences

last month
Land disappearing in a warmer Arctic // Qikiqtaruk-Herschel Island is composed almost entirely of permafrost.  Each year, thawing soils and coastal erosion peel back the island’s edges, dumping sediment into the shallow waters of the southern Beaufort Sea (part of the Arctic Ocean). This is the eastern tip of the island, and from this vantage point you can see all of these processes at work as the tundra fractures and turns into soup.  Coastal erosion, permafrost slumping, tundra vegetation change, sediment deposition are are on the increase - not just here, but along huge sections of the Arctic coast.  In some areas the soil is mostly ice, and in others huge deposits of dead but never decayed plant life are re-entering the carbon cycle after being locked away for thousands of years.  Dumping new carbon stores into the Arctic is akin to dumping gasoline onto a fire. Shot while on assignment with @insidenatgeo grantees @teamshrub and @gndaskalova in the Canadian Arctic. // On Sept 19, I’ll be speaking at #NatGeoNights in DC about my experiences over the past 10 years working in the north.  Other speakers include @katieorlinsky and @jenniferkingsley - come check it out! #Yukon #Arctic #Permafrost #NatGeo #ClimateChange
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Land disappearing in a warmer Arctic // Qikiqtaruk-Herschel Island is composed almost entirely of permafrost. Each year, thawing soils and coastal erosion peel back the island’s edges, dumping sediment into the shallow waters of the southern Beaufort Sea (part of the Arctic Ocean). This is the eastern tip of the island, and from this vantage point you can see all of these processes at work as the tundra fractures and turns into soup. Coastal erosion, permafrost slumping, tundra vegetation change, sediment deposition are are on the increase - not just here, but along huge sections of the Arctic coast. In some areas the soil is mostly ice, and in others huge deposits of dead but never decayed plant life are re-entering the carbon cycle after being locked away for thousands of years. Dumping new carbon stores into the Arctic is akin to dumping gasoline onto a fire. Shot while on assignment with @insidenatgeo grantees @teamshrub and @gndaskalova in the Canadian Arctic. // On Sept 19, I’ll be speaking at #NatGeoNights in DC about my experiences over the past 10 years working in the north. Other speakers include @katieorlinsky and @jenniferkingsley - come check it out! #Yukon #Arctic #Permafrost #NatGeo #ClimateChange

last month
No bigger than your smallest fingernail, this late season whirl of feathery hairs means the mountain avens will soon send their seeds into the wind.  Their summer is over almost as soon as it starts, something I can certainly relate to. Despite the endless days, northern life is rushed in the warm months, hurrying to get a year’s worth of living done before the cold and darkness return.  Spending this last part of the season with @insidenatgeo grantees Isla Myers-Smith (@teamshrub) and Gergana Daskalova (@gndaskalova) on Qikiqtaruk-Herschel Island was not just about the study of tundra plants,  but was also a chance to reflect on the little details that shape our world. #Arctic #Fieldwork #Canada #Yukon #Dryas #NatGeo #Tundra
1k likes 4

No bigger than your smallest fingernail, this late season whirl of feathery hairs means the mountain avens will soon send their seeds into the wind. Their summer is over almost as soon as it starts, something I can certainly relate to. Despite the endless days, northern life is rushed in the warm months, hurrying to get a year’s worth of living done before the cold and darkness return. Spending this last part of the season with @insidenatgeo grantees Isla Myers-Smith (@teamshrub) and Gergana Daskalova (@gndaskalova) on Qikiqtaruk-Herschel Island was not just about the study of tundra plants, but was also a chance to reflect on the little details that shape our world. #Arctic #Fieldwork #Canada #Yukon #Dryas #NatGeo #Tundra

last month
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