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President Trump on Tuesday called the impeachment inquiry a “lynching,” a reference certain to inflame tensions. Trump used the term in a morning tweet in which he suggested he was not being afforded due process by the Democrat-led House. “So some day, if a Democrat becomes President and the Republicans win the House, even by a tiny margin, they can impeach the President, without due process or fairness or any legal rights,” he tweeted. “All Republicans must remember what they are witnessing here - a lynching. But we will WIN!” Read more by clicking the link in our bio.
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President Trump on Tuesday called the impeachment inquiry a “lynching,” a reference certain to inflame tensions. Trump used the term in a morning tweet in which he suggested he was not being afforded due process by the Democrat-led House. “So some day, if a Democrat becomes President and the Republicans win the House, even by a tiny margin, they can impeach the President, without due process or fairness or any legal rights,” he tweeted. “All Republicans must remember what they are witnessing here - a lynching. But we will WIN!” Read more by clicking the link in our bio.

43 minutes ago
In an interview with Fox News host Sean Hannity Monday night, President Trump said he doesn’t want copies of the New York Times or The Washington Post inside the White House. He asserted that the press has treated the Biden family more favorably than his family. Then he suggested that the White House might cancel its subscriptions to newspapers he considers “corrupt.” “All these people for doing it from the New York Times, which is a fake newspaper — we don’t even want it in the White House anymore,” he said during his interview with Hannity. “We’re going to probably terminate that and The Washington Post. They’re fake.” Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by @jabinbotsford/The Washington Post)
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In an interview with Fox News host Sean Hannity Monday night, President Trump said he doesn’t want copies of the New York Times or The Washington Post inside the White House. He asserted that the press has treated the Biden family more favorably than his family. Then he suggested that the White House might cancel its subscriptions to newspapers he considers “corrupt.” “All these people for doing it from the New York Times, which is a fake newspaper — we don’t even want it in the White House anymore,” he said during his interview with Hannity. “We’re going to probably terminate that and The Washington Post. They’re fake.” Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by @jabinbotsford/The Washington Post)

1 hour ago
During a raucous Cabinet meeting Monday, President Trump called on Republicans to “get tougher” before making a stream of false allegations about several of his predecessors, from George Washington to Barack Obama. In extemporaneous remarks that lasted more than an hour, he also railed against a “phony investigation” of his dealings with Ukraine and blasted the “phony emoluments clause” of the Constitution, which played a role in forcing him to scrap plans to host a global summit at his private golf club in Florida. Behind the scenes, Trump’s erratic behavior is causing growing alarm among Republican lawmakers, donors and advisers who have called for a more disciplined impeachment response from the White House. Administration officials Monday played down GOP anxiety as passing and typical of difficult junctures for Trump, but congressional allies told The Post they remain uneasy about the president’s freewheeling style. Some major Republican donors have made it clear to party leaders and White House officials that they are unhappy with what they see as uncertainty and mixed messages. Read more by clicking the link in our bio.
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During a raucous Cabinet meeting Monday, President Trump called on Republicans to “get tougher” before making a stream of false allegations about several of his predecessors, from George Washington to Barack Obama. In extemporaneous remarks that lasted more than an hour, he also railed against a “phony investigation” of his dealings with Ukraine and blasted the “phony emoluments clause” of the Constitution, which played a role in forcing him to scrap plans to host a global summit at his private golf club in Florida. Behind the scenes, Trump’s erratic behavior is causing growing alarm among Republican lawmakers, donors and advisers who have called for a more disciplined impeachment response from the White House. Administration officials Monday played down GOP anxiety as passing and typical of difficult junctures for Trump, but congressional allies told The Post they remain uneasy about the president’s freewheeling style. Some major Republican donors have made it clear to party leaders and White House officials that they are unhappy with what they see as uncertainty and mixed messages. Read more by clicking the link in our bio.

15 hours ago
Under President Trump, Cabinet meetings have become less about the business of his cabinet and more of an opportunity for him to invite in the press to and boast of his own accomplishments, lash out at his critics and to hear the praise from advisers seated around the table. The gatherings, with the press in attendance, often stretch for 60 to 90 minutes. On Monday, the president seemed particularly aggrieved by criticism of his foreign policy decisions in the Middle East, his attempt to stage the Group of Seven meeting at his golf resort in Florida and the ongoing impeachment inquiry by House Democrats. On every front he said, he was undeserving of the criticism and tried to deflect it back on his opponents. Much of the event seemed about self-validation as Trump’s allies describe a presidency under siege — and a president frustrated with an onslaught of criticism. Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post)
1.5k likes 195

Under President Trump, Cabinet meetings have become less about the business of his cabinet and more of an opportunity for him to invite in the press to and boast of his own accomplishments, lash out at his critics and to hear the praise from advisers seated around the table. The gatherings, with the press in attendance, often stretch for 60 to 90 minutes. On Monday, the president seemed particularly aggrieved by criticism of his foreign policy decisions in the Middle East, his attempt to stage the Group of Seven meeting at his golf resort in Florida and the ongoing impeachment inquiry by House Democrats. On every front he said, he was undeserving of the criticism and tried to deflect it back on his opponents. Much of the event seemed about self-validation as Trump’s allies describe a presidency under siege — and a president frustrated with an onslaught of criticism. Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by Ricky Carioti/The Washington Post)

18 hours ago
Discussing the impeachment inquiry on Monday, President Trump claimed that Democrats have "nothing," adding that the whistleblowers have "disappeared." Democrats want to "impeach me because it's the only way they're gonna win," he said.
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Discussing the impeachment inquiry on Monday, President Trump claimed that Democrats have "nothing," adding that the whistleblowers have "disappeared." Democrats want to "impeach me because it's the only way they're gonna win," he said.

21 hours ago
President Trump has entered the most challenging stretch of his time in the White House, weakened on virtually every front and in danger of being forced from office as the impeachment inquiry intensifies. Foreign leaders feel emboldened to reject his pleas or to contradict him. Officials inside his administration are openly defying his wishes by participating in the impeachment probe. Federal courts have ruled against him. Republican lawmakers are criticizing him. And in a rare concession to his critics, Trump announced late Saturday that he no longer plans to host the Group of Seven summit of world leaders at his Florida golf club, folding after two days of intense criticism over having picked his own property as the venue for a diplomatic gathering. Trump’s supremacy is being challenged inside his own realm. With his administration engulfed by crisis, the president can no longer control the forces once solidly arrayed behind him. Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by @jabinbotsford/The Washington Post)
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President Trump has entered the most challenging stretch of his time in the White House, weakened on virtually every front and in danger of being forced from office as the impeachment inquiry intensifies. Foreign leaders feel emboldened to reject his pleas or to contradict him. Officials inside his administration are openly defying his wishes by participating in the impeachment probe. Federal courts have ruled against him. Republican lawmakers are criticizing him. And in a rare concession to his critics, Trump announced late Saturday that he no longer plans to host the Group of Seven summit of world leaders at his Florida golf club, folding after two days of intense criticism over having picked his own property as the venue for a diplomatic gathering. Trump’s supremacy is being challenged inside his own realm. With his administration engulfed by crisis, the president can no longer control the forces once solidly arrayed behind him. Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by @jabinbotsford/The Washington Post)

23 hours ago
President Trump attended the opening of the new Louis Vuitton factory in Johnson County, Tex., on Friday.
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President Trump attended the opening of the new Louis Vuitton factory in Johnson County, Tex., on Friday.

3 days ago
Over two weeks of closed-door testimony during the impeachment inquiry, a clear portrait has emerged of President Trump personally orchestrating the effort to pressure a foreign government to dig up dirt on a potential 2020 political rival. Contrary to weeks of denials from the president and his defenders, a growing body of evidence makes clear it was Trump himself who repeatedly pushed his own government and a foreign power to intervene in domestic political concerns, enlisting and ensnaring a growing number of administration officials in a way that increasingly made even some members of his own team uncomfortable. Not only are a growing number of officials and longtime employees choosing to come forward with damaging evidence, the narrative they are laying out points to potential violations of law, including prohibitions on accepting campaign help from a foreign entity, that bolster the case for impeachment. Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by @jabinbotsford/The Washington Post)
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Over two weeks of closed-door testimony during the impeachment inquiry, a clear portrait has emerged of President Trump personally orchestrating the effort to pressure a foreign government to dig up dirt on a potential 2020 political rival. Contrary to weeks of denials from the president and his defenders, a growing body of evidence makes clear it was Trump himself who repeatedly pushed his own government and a foreign power to intervene in domestic political concerns, enlisting and ensnaring a growing number of administration officials in a way that increasingly made even some members of his own team uncomfortable. Not only are a growing number of officials and longtime employees choosing to come forward with damaging evidence, the narrative they are laying out points to potential violations of law, including prohibitions on accepting campaign help from a foreign entity, that bolster the case for impeachment. Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by @jabinbotsford/The Washington Post)

3 days ago
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During a campaign rally in Dallas Thursday night, President Trump argued it had been wise for him to allow Turkish forces to invade and attack Kurds because “sometimes you have to let them fight a little while.” Trump likened the warring in Syria to a schoolyard squabble. The president marveled at the fighting, saying “it was pretty vicious,” and adding, “It was nasty. … It’s not fun having bullets going all over the place.” Trump defended his handling of the situation because, as he saw it, he had given the Turks and Kurds a lesson in “tough love.” Outside the arena in downtown Dallas, hundreds of protesters — many of them Kurdish American — gathered with Kurdistan flags and signs denouncing Turkey’s invasion of Syria. There was a massive red sign that read: “Kurds lost 11,000 lives. Trump rewarded them a ‘great betrayal.’ ” And there were chants of: “We want Turkey out of NATO,” and “Trump betrayed the Kurds!” Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images)

4 days ago
In the White House briefing room on Thursday, acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney  acknowledged for the first time that the Trump administration held up military aid to Ukraine in part due to the president’s request that country investigate a Democratic National Committee server. “We do that all the time with foreign policy,” Mulvaney said when asked about criticism that the administration’s dealings with Ukraine amounted to a quid pro quo. “I have news for everybody: Get over it,” Mulvaney said of the administration’s handling of the military aid to Ukraine. “There’s going to be political influence in foreign policy. . . . That’s going to happen. Elections have consequences, and foreign policy is going to change from the Obama administration to the Trump administration.” Read more by clicking the link in our bio.
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In the White House briefing room on Thursday, acting White House chief of staff Mick Mulvaney acknowledged for the first time that the Trump administration held up military aid to Ukraine in part due to the president’s request that country investigate a Democratic National Committee server. “We do that all the time with foreign policy,” Mulvaney said when asked about criticism that the administration’s dealings with Ukraine amounted to a quid pro quo. “I have news for everybody: Get over it,” Mulvaney said of the administration’s handling of the military aid to Ukraine. “There’s going to be political influence in foreign policy. . . . That’s going to happen. Elections have consequences, and foreign policy is going to change from the Obama administration to the Trump administration.” Read more by clicking the link in our bio.

4 days ago
Breaking news: President Trump has awarded the G-7 Summit of world leaders to his own private company, scheduling the massive gathering for next year at his Trump Doral resort outside Miami. The president's decision will bring hundreds of diplomats, media and security personnel to his financially struggling resort — where profits fell 70 percent after Trump entered politics. This appears to be the first time in American history that a president has given such a massive contract to himself. Trump still owns the Doral resort, and can draw profits from it, though his company has said they will not over-charge the government. Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by @jabinbotsford/The Washington Post)
1.4k likes 425

Breaking news: President Trump has awarded the G-7 Summit of world leaders to his own private company, scheduling the massive gathering for next year at his Trump Doral resort outside Miami. The president's decision will bring hundreds of diplomats, media and security personnel to his financially struggling resort — where profits fell 70 percent after Trump entered politics. This appears to be the first time in American history that a president has given such a massive contract to himself. Trump still owns the Doral resort, and can draw profits from it, though his company has said they will not over-charge the government. Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by @jabinbotsford/The Washington Post)

4 days ago
Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer on Wednesday said President Trump’s plan for containing the Islamic State was not based on U.S. intelligence.
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Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer on Wednesday said President Trump’s plan for containing the Islamic State was not based on U.S. intelligence.

5 days ago
At a news conference with Italian President Sergio Mattarella on Wednesday, President Trump was asked by an Italian reporter about Attorney General William Barr’s meetings with Italian officials. Trump dodged the question, but then pivoted, declaring that there was “a lot of corruption” in the 2016 campaign and accusing former president Barack Obama of being behind it. No evidence has emerged to back up Trump’s assertion. “There was a lot of corruption; maybe it goes right up to President Obama,” Trump said. “I happen to think that it does.” Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by @jabionbotsford/The Washington Post)
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At a news conference with Italian President Sergio Mattarella on Wednesday, President Trump was asked by an Italian reporter about Attorney General William Barr’s meetings with Italian officials. Trump dodged the question, but then pivoted, declaring that there was “a lot of corruption” in the 2016 campaign and accusing former president Barack Obama of being behind it. No evidence has emerged to back up Trump’s assertion. “There was a lot of corruption; maybe it goes right up to President Obama,” Trump said. “I happen to think that it does.” Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by @jabionbotsford/The Washington Post)

5 days ago
At a joint press conference on Wednesday, President Trump said he would always recognize Columbus Day even as some changed the day to "Indigenous Peoples Day."
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At a joint press conference on Wednesday, President Trump said he would always recognize Columbus Day even as some changed the day to "Indigenous Peoples Day."

5 days ago
On Wednesday, President Trump defended and downplayed his decision to pull U.S. troops out of northern Syria, which critics say resulted in giving Turkey a green light to invade the region and attack the Kurdish fighters who were America’s allies. “It’s not between Turkey and Syria and the United States,” he said in remarks from the Oval Office. “They’ve got to work it out.” Of the Kurds, Trump added: “They’re no angels. They’re no angels. Go back and take a look." He also said that the Kurdish forces would be fine because “they know how to fight.” Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by Evan Vucci/AP)
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On Wednesday, President Trump defended and downplayed his decision to pull U.S. troops out of northern Syria, which critics say resulted in giving Turkey a green light to invade the region and attack the Kurdish fighters who were America’s allies. “It’s not between Turkey and Syria and the United States,” he said in remarks from the Oval Office. “They’ve got to work it out.” Of the Kurds, Trump added: “They’re no angels. They’re no angels. Go back and take a look." He also said that the Kurdish forces would be fine because “they know how to fight.” Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by Evan Vucci/AP)

5 days ago
Last week, as President Trump pulled U.S. troops out of northeastern Syria, he suggested that he had the power to “totally destroy and obliterate” the Turkish economy if the Turkish incursion continued. Trump appeared to be referring to economic sanctions, but analysts said those sanctions aren’t expected to dramatically affect the Turkish economy. Meanwhile, Turkey has plowed ahead with its offensive in Syria. Backed into a corner as Washington weighs what to do next, Trump will have to choose between a handful of weak options — none of which observers expect would make an immediate impact on the ground. Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by @jabinbotsford/The Washington Post)
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Last week, as President Trump pulled U.S. troops out of northeastern Syria, he suggested that he had the power to “totally destroy and obliterate” the Turkish economy if the Turkish incursion continued. Trump appeared to be referring to economic sanctions, but analysts said those sanctions aren’t expected to dramatically affect the Turkish economy. Meanwhile, Turkey has plowed ahead with its offensive in Syria. Backed into a corner as Washington weighs what to do next, Trump will have to choose between a handful of weak options — none of which observers expect would make an immediate impact on the ground. Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by @jabinbotsford/The Washington Post)

6 days ago
President Trump said this week that he could “swiftly destroy Turkey’s economy” if the United States’ NATO ally continues its military incursion in northern Syria. He's not wrong. But so far, the president has limited the financial punishment for the Turkish invasion. He has imposed sanctions on a handful of current and former Turkish officials, doubled tariffs on imports of Turkish steel, and halted negotiations aimed at increasing trade between the two countries. Congress may force the president to follow through on his tougher talk, but Trump already has the power to do more. Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by @jaheezus/The Washington Post)
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President Trump said this week that he could “swiftly destroy Turkey’s economy” if the United States’ NATO ally continues its military incursion in northern Syria. He's not wrong. But so far, the president has limited the financial punishment for the Turkish invasion. He has imposed sanctions on a handful of current and former Turkish officials, doubled tariffs on imports of Turkish steel, and halted negotiations aimed at increasing trade between the two countries. Congress may force the president to follow through on his tougher talk, but Trump already has the power to do more. Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by @jaheezus/The Washington Post)

6 days ago
Fiona Hill, the White House’s former top Russia adviser, told impeachment investigators on Monday that Rudy Giuliani ran a shadow foreign policy in Ukraine in order to personally benefit President Trump, people familiar with her testimony told The Post. Hill was the latest witness in a fast-moving impeachment inquiry focused on whether Trump abused his office by using the promise of military aid and diplomatic support to pressure Ukraine into investigating his political rivals. Giuliani said Monday night: “I don’t know Fiona and can’t figure out what she is talking about,” adding that his contact with Ukrainian officials was set up with the State Department. “I reported everything back to them,” he said. “Nothing shadowy about it.” Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by Charles Krupa/AP)
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Fiona Hill, the White House’s former top Russia adviser, told impeachment investigators on Monday that Rudy Giuliani ran a shadow foreign policy in Ukraine in order to personally benefit President Trump, people familiar with her testimony told The Post. Hill was the latest witness in a fast-moving impeachment inquiry focused on whether Trump abused his office by using the promise of military aid and diplomatic support to pressure Ukraine into investigating his political rivals. Giuliani said Monday night: “I don’t know Fiona and can’t figure out what she is talking about,” adding that his contact with Ukrainian officials was set up with the State Department. “I reported everything back to them,” he said. “Nothing shadowy about it.” Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by Charles Krupa/AP)

1 weeks ago
President Trump said Monday that he would “soon” authorize sanctions against the highest levels of the Turkish government, as the situation on the ground in northern Syria continues to deteriorate following the recent withdrawal of U.S. forces in the region. the president did not specify when the sanctions would be leveled against Turkey. Trump also said tariffs on steel imports from Turkey will be raised 50 percent, and that the U.S. has halted negotiations over a $100 billion trade deal with the country. “The United States will aggressively use economic sanctions to target those who enable, facilitate and finance these heinous acts in Syria,” Trump said in a statement released on his Twitter feed Monday afternoon. “I am fully prepared to swiftly destroy Turkey’s economy if Turkish leaders continue down this dangerous and destructive path.” Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by @jabinbotsford/The Washington Post)
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President Trump said Monday that he would “soon” authorize sanctions against the highest levels of the Turkish government, as the situation on the ground in northern Syria continues to deteriorate following the recent withdrawal of U.S. forces in the region. the president did not specify when the sanctions would be leveled against Turkey. Trump also said tariffs on steel imports from Turkey will be raised 50 percent, and that the U.S. has halted negotiations over a $100 billion trade deal with the country. “The United States will aggressively use economic sanctions to target those who enable, facilitate and finance these heinous acts in Syria,” Trump said in a statement released on his Twitter feed Monday afternoon. “I am fully prepared to swiftly destroy Turkey’s economy if Turkish leaders continue down this dangerous and destructive path.” Read more by clicking the link in our bio. (Photo by @jabinbotsford/The Washington Post)

1 weeks ago
In a fake video that was shown during a pro-Trump conference last week, people with their faces replaced by the logos of news organizations such as CNN, NBC, Politico and HuffPost are brutally stabbed and shot. At the center of the bloody rampage unfolding in the “Church of Fake News” is a man dressed in a dark pinstripe suit. President Trump’s head is superimposed on his body. The New York Times first reported on the video’s existence Sunday night. The clip has since drawn intense backlash from journalists and public figures who have decried it as “vile and horrific” and an “incitement of violence.” Many of the news organizations and people featured in the video have been publicly targeted by Trump, who is frequently criticized for his inflammatory remarks and anti-media rhetoric. Read more by clicking the link in our bio.
1k likes 116

In a fake video that was shown during a pro-Trump conference last week, people with their faces replaced by the logos of news organizations such as CNN, NBC, Politico and HuffPost are brutally stabbed and shot. At the center of the bloody rampage unfolding in the “Church of Fake News” is a man dressed in a dark pinstripe suit. President Trump’s head is superimposed on his body. The New York Times first reported on the video’s existence Sunday night. The clip has since drawn intense backlash from journalists and public figures who have decried it as “vile and horrific” and an “incitement of violence.” Many of the news organizations and people featured in the video have been publicly targeted by Trump, who is frequently criticized for his inflammatory remarks and anti-media rhetoric. Read more by clicking the link in our bio.

1 weeks ago
President Trump’s order to withdraw essentially all U.S. forces from northern Syria came after the commander in chief privately agitated for days to bring troops home, according to administration officials — even while the Pentagon was making public assurances that the United States was not abandoning its Kurdish allies in the region. The officials, granted anonymity to describe internal deliberations, described Trump as “doubling down” and “undeterred,” despite vociferous pushback from congressional Republicans who have been loath to challenge the president apart from a few issues, such as national security. Behind the scenes, Trump has tried to convince advisers and lawmakers that the United States is not to blame for Turkey’s military offensive, which has targeted Kurdish fighters who have aided the U.S. fight against the Islamic State.Go to the link in our bio to read more. (Photo by @jabinbotsford/The Washington Post)
864 likes 143

President Trump’s order to withdraw essentially all U.S. forces from northern Syria came after the commander in chief privately agitated for days to bring troops home, according to administration officials — even while the Pentagon was making public assurances that the United States was not abandoning its Kurdish allies in the region. The officials, granted anonymity to describe internal deliberations, described Trump as “doubling down” and “undeterred,” despite vociferous pushback from congressional Republicans who have been loath to challenge the president apart from a few issues, such as national security. Behind the scenes, Trump has tried to convince advisers and lawmakers that the United States is not to blame for Turkey’s military offensive, which has targeted Kurdish fighters who have aided the U.S. fight against the Islamic State.Go to the link in our bio to read more. (Photo by @jabinbotsford/The Washington Post)

2 weeks ago
President Trump has ordered a withdrawal of U.S. forces from northern Syria in the face of a Turkish military offensive targeting Kurdish fighters in the region, Defense Secretary Mark T. Esper said Sunday, two days after he promised that the United States was not “abandoning” its partners in the campaign against the Islamic State. Trump ordered a withdrawal of the about 1,000 U.S. troops left in northern Syria late Saturday. The president made the decision after indications that Turkey intends to expand its attack “farther south than originally planned and to the west,” Esper said, speaking on CBS News’s “Face the Nation.” Go to the link in our bio to read more. (Photo by @jaheezus/The Washington Post)
842 likes 194

President Trump has ordered a withdrawal of U.S. forces from northern Syria in the face of a Turkish military offensive targeting Kurdish fighters in the region, Defense Secretary Mark T. Esper said Sunday, two days after he promised that the United States was not “abandoning” its partners in the campaign against the Islamic State. Trump ordered a withdrawal of the about 1,000 U.S. troops left in northern Syria late Saturday. The president made the decision after indications that Turkey intends to expand its attack “farther south than originally planned and to the west,” Esper said, speaking on CBS News’s “Face the Nation.” Go to the link in our bio to read more. (Photo by @jaheezus/The Washington Post)

2 weeks ago
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